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Freddie Mercury Hologram: Trademark Obtained for Tech That Could Let Late Queen Frontman Perform Again

The company that owns the singer's solo work has has filed a trademark to use his likeness in 'immersive 3D virtual, augmented, and mixed reality experiences.'

Queen
Source: MEGA

Cutting edge technology could potentially bring a Freddie Mercury hologram to Queen's live shows.

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Fans of Queen could see the band's late frontman Freddie Mercury perform live again someday via cutting edge hologram technology.

Mercury Songs Limited, the company that owns the singer's solo work, has filed a trademark to use his likeness in "immersive 3D virtual, augmented, and mixed reality experiences" for "virtual environments," according to legal documents obtained by The Sun.

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Queen
Source: MEGA

The company that owns the singer's solo work has has filed a trademark to use his likeness in 'immersive 3D virtual, augmented, and mixed reality experiences.'

The hologram would be similar to the ABBA Voyage show that's currently playing in London.

KISS debuted virtual avatars who are meant to carry the band's live show on into their retirement at the end of their farewell tour in December 2023. Similar technology has been used to revive other long-gone stars like Elvis Presley and Tupac Shakur.

Queen has also technology to create an illusion of Mercury at their concerts. Guitarist Brian May wept on stage after he performed "Love of My Life" alongside the singer's likeness for the first time in decades during the band's tour with Adam Lambert in 2022.

"We have a little bit of stuff with Freddie," May said during his appearance on The Graham Norton Show last year. "But it's not a hologram, it's just sort of old-school technology which we kind of like."

He added that Queen has explored the possibility of a Mercury hologram, as well, but will probably wait until the band's career is over.

"We love to be live and dangerous, that’s it, that’s our emphasis," May said. "Now, when we’re all gone, yeah sure, make an ABBA thing about us, but while we’re here I want to play live."

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Mercury died from AIDS-related complications at age 45 in 1991. The singer was born in Tanzania, which was then part of a British colony called Zanzibar. Mercury and his family fled to England following the Zanzibar Revolution in 1964.

The singer was performing in a blues band called Wreckage and studying at the Ealing Art College when he met May in the late 1960s.

They formed Queen in 1970, which went on to release 15 studio albums. Seven of those LPs made it to No. 1 on the albums chart in the U.K.

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Queen
Source: MEGA

The singer died from AIDS complications at age 45 in 1991.

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Mercury is remembered as one of the greatest rock singers of all time, but was also an important LGBTQ+ icon.

Towards the end of his life, Mercury tried to keep his HIV diagnosis hidden from the public. Still, there was lots of speculation about the topic in the press starting in the late 1980s. Mercury ended up releasing a statement about his condition two days before his death.

"Following the enormous conjecture in the press over the last two weeks, I wish to confirm that I have been tested HIV positive and have AIDS," the singer said.

"I felt it correct to keep this information private to date to protect the privacy of those around me. However, the time has come now for my friends and fans around the world to know the truth and I hope that everyone will join with me, my doctors and all those worldwide in the fight against this terrible disease. My privacy has always been very special to me and I am famous for my lack of interviews. Please understand this policy will continue."

Queen
Source: MEGA

Queen's guitarist Brian May wept when a Mercury illusion was debuted at one of the band's shows in 2022.

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May has been doing his best to carry on Mercury's legacy ever since.

The guitarist recently shared that the cross-dressing characters the band played in the music video for their 1984 song "I Want to Break Free" have been turned into Funko Pop figurines.

"Do I have them? No! Do you need them? Do I need them?!" may wrote in the caption of his Instagram post.

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