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'Queen's Palace': Freddie Mercury's London Mansion Hits Market at $38 Million

'It has been a joy to live in and I have many wonderful memories here,' said the singer's former fiancee Mary Austin.

Queen
Source: MEGA

The London mansion formerly owned by late Queen frontman Freddie Mercury has hit the market at $38 million.

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Freddie Mercury's former home in London is on the market for the first time since the legendary Queen frontman's death in 1991.

The estate is listed at an eye-watering £30 million ($38 million), but some might consider that a reasonable price to pay for a tangential connection to the singer.

The eight-bedroom neo-Georgian mansion in the tony Kensington neighborhood was purchased by Mercury in 1980. He lived there until his death at age 45 in 1991.

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Queen
Source: MEGA

The eight-bedroom neo-Georgian mansion is located in the tony Kensington neighborhood.

After that, the property was passed onto the singer's former fiancee Mary Austin.

"This house has been the most glorious memory box, because it has such love and warmth in every room," she said in a press release obtained by Forbes.

"It has been a joy to live in and I have many wonderful memories here. Now that it is empty, I’m transported back to the first time we viewed it…

"Ever since Freddie and I stepped through the fabled green door, it has been a place of peace, a true artist’s house, and now is the time to entrust that sense of peace to the next person."

The center of the home is the drawing room, where Mercury put his piano. That's where he wrote Queen's iconic 1975 anthem "Bohemian Rhapsody."

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The listing came after Austin auctioned off more than $50 million worth of items she inherited from Mercury last year via Sotheby's. The collection included everything from art and jewelry to clothing and musical instruments.

This was not the only big Queen news this week.

Mercury Songs Limited, the company that owns Mercury's solo work, recently filed a trademark to use his image in "immersive 3D virtual, augmented, and mixed reality experiences" for "virtual environments," according to documents obtained by The Sun.

The hologram would be similar to the ABBA Voyage show that's currently playing in London.

Last December, KISS debuted virtual avatars who are meant to carry the band's live show on into their retirement at the end of their farewell tour. Similar technology has been used to revive long-gone icons like Elvis Presley and Tupac Shakur.

Queen has also technology to create an illusion of Mercury at their concerts. Guitarist Brian May wept on stage after he performed "Love of My Life" alongside the singer's likeness for the first time in decades during the band's tour with Adam Lambert in 2022.

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Queen
Source: MEGA

'It has been a joy to live in and I have many wonderful memories here,' said the singer's former fiancee Mary Austin.

"We have a little bit of stuff with Freddie," May said during his appearance on The Graham Norton Show last year. "But it's not a hologram, it's just sort of old-school technology which we kind of like."

He added that Queen has explored the possibility of a Mercury hologram, as well, but will probably wait until the band's career is over.

"We love to be live and dangerous, that’s it, that’s our emphasis," May said. "Now, when we’re all gone, yeah sure, make an ABBA thing about us, but while we’re here I want to play live."

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Mercury died from AIDS-related complications at age 45. The singer was born in Tanzania, which was then part of a British colony called Zanzibar. Mercury and his family fled to England following the Zanzibar Revolution in 1964.

The singer was performing in a blues band called Wreckage and studying at the Ealing Art College when he met May in the late 1960s.

They formed Queen in 1970, which went on to release 15 studio albums. Seven of those LPs made it to No. 1 on the albums chart in the U.K.

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