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James Blake Launches a Music Subscription Platform Called Vault

'I wanted to find a way for musicians to make money directly from the music they make,' Blake said.

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Source: MEGA

Vault allows fans to subscribe directly to an artist's page for a monthly fee in order to receive unreleased music.

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After going viral earlier this month for speaking out about how hard it is for musicians to make a living off of royalties in today's streaming economy, singer-songwriter and producer James Blake has helped launch a new direct-to-fan music subscription platform called Vault.

"I wanted to find a way for musicians to make money directly from the music they make," Blake said in a video promoting the launch on social media.

"It's music direct from me to you where no one can gatekeep what I release to you or delay my releases and it's got a chat section for everyone to discuss the music."

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The idea behind Vault is that fans can subscribe directly to an artist's page for a monthly fee in order to receive unreleased music and "hear first about ticket drops and anything else."

"The concept of subscribing to an artist directly I think can change the game and release artists from the relentless merry-go-round of the current state of things," Blake continued. "This is a hopefully a great step towards allowing artists to be as authentic as possible while still making a living."

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Blake is the first artist to be featured on the platform, which is still in the process of developing more features. You can subscribe to his Vault page for $5 a month; he currently has four tracks uploaded.

Some users on social media have compared Vault to Patreon and dubbed it "OnlyFans for artists" or "Substack for music," references to similar subscription-based platforms for content creators.

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Source: MEGA

James Blake went viral on Twitter earlier this month for speaking out about how hard it is for musicians to make a living off of royalties in today's streaming economy.

"I think it's important to note that Vault works in conjunction with other streaming," Blake added in a series of tweets. "It offers an outlet that artists haven't really had before especially in a form that's friendly to listeners, in a way that monetizes fairly (price set by artist).

"Vault is a place to share music more intimately before songs are out anywhere else (if at all, your choice), instantaneously and with the ability to communicate with your audience. We can’t reach our own fans on DSPs. Why can’t we? Cause they own the data. With Vault, the artist owns the data."

"Something people might not understand about subscription ... for an artist it means some certainty. Most artists will tell you they've rarely felt it in their lives. I want artists to have less anxiety about what they put out, less fear that it leads to uncertainty. We'll never be able to eliminate uncertainty from music, but platforms need to encourage artists to make their favorite, most integral music, not just the big 15 second TikTok moment."

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Blake said that the creators of Vault initially contacted him after he took to social media to discuss how "the industry is beyond f---ked and musicians are getting f---ked harder than anyone."

"If we want quality music somebody is gonna have to pay for it," he wrote. "Streaming services don’t pay properly, labels want a bigger cut than ever and just sit and wait for you to go viral, TikTok doesn't pay properly, and touring is getting prohibitively expensive for most artists. The brainwashing worked and now people think music is free."

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